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Purging Disorder

September 9, 2022

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Purging Disorder

What is Purging Disorder?

Purging disorder is a mental disorder characterized by the recurrent and persistent urge to vomit or to use laxatives, even if there is no food in the stomach. The disorder usually begins in early adulthood and is more common in women than in men. It is estimated that about 1 percent of the population suffers from purging disorder.

The cause of purging disorder is unknown, but it may be related to a person's emotional state. People with the disorder may feel overwhelmed or stressed, and may believe that vomiting or using laxatives will help them to feel better.

Purging disorder can be a very serious mental disorder. People with the disorder may experience episodes of vomiting or diarrhea that can lead to serious health problems, including dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and even death.

There is no cure for purging disorder, but treatment can help people manage the disorder. Treatment may include counseling, medication, and therapy.

If you are concerned that you may have purging disorder, please contact your doctor.

What are causes of Purging Disorder?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Some possible causes of "Purging Disorder" could include anxiety, depression, stress, or a history of self-harm. Other possible causes could include problems with eating or sleeping, a lack of self-confidence, or a feeling of being overwhelmed.

What are symptoms of Purging Disorder?

Symptoms of purging disorder can include:

  • Excessive and uncontrolled vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Excessive use of laxatives or other purging methods.
  • Using excessive amounts of cold or hot liquids, ice, or other substances to try to cleanse the body.
  • Using excessive amounts of caffeine, alcohol, or other substances to try to escape feelings of discomfort.
  • Becoming extremely agitated or restless.
  • Engaging in self-mutilation, such as cutting or burning oneself.

How to prevent from Purging Disorder?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best way to prevent from "Purging Disorder" will vary depending on the individual's specific circumstances and history. However, some tips that may help prevent from "Purging Disorder" include:

  • Talking openly and honestly with friends and family about your struggles with eating and weight, so they can support and encourage you.
  • Keeping a food journal to track your eating and weight, so you can see where you're going off track and make adjustments as needed.
  • Seeking professional help if you find yourself struggling with eating or weight for an extended period of time.
  • Making sure to get enough exercise, both physically and mentally, to help keep your body and mind healthy and functioning properly.

How is Purging Disorder diagnosed?

There is not one definitive diagnostic criteria for "Purging Disorder." However, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) defines purging disorder as a "persistent pattern of recurrent episodes of self-induced vomiting, fasting, or excessive use of laxatives, over a period of at least six months." In order to be diagnosed with purging disorder, the individual must have at least two episodes of purging behavior in a 12-month period. In addition, the episodes must be associated with significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

How is Purging Disorder treated?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to treating purging disorder, as the best approach will vary depending on the individual's symptoms and history. However, some common treatments include medication, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes.

Medications:

Some people with purging disorder may benefit from medications that treat anxiety or depression, such as SSRIs or SNRIs. Other medications, such as tricyclic antidepressants, may be less effective but may be more tolerable. It is important to discuss the potential benefits and risks of any medications with a doctor before starting treatment.

Psychotherapy:

Psychotherapy can be helpful for people with purging disorder who are struggling with their emotions. Therapists may help people learn how to manage their emotions and cope with stress.

Lifestyle changes:

Some lifestyle changes may help people with purging disorder cope with their symptoms. These changes may include eating a balanced diet, getting enough exercise, and avoiding caffeine and alcohol.

When to consult a doctor in Purging Disorder?

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, it is important to consult a doctor:

  • A feeling of intense anxiety, fear, or panic.
  • A feeling of emptiness or lack of appetite.
  • A feeling of worthlessness or excessive guilt.
  • A feeling of being overwhelmed or out of control.
  • A feeling of being sick to your stomach or throwing up.
  • A feeling of being unsteady on your feet.
  • A feeling of being lightheaded or dizzy.
  • A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or both.
  • A change in mood, such as feeling irritable, restless, or depressed.
  • A change in sleep patterns, such as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.
  • A change in energy levels.
  • A change in thoughts, such as feeling paranoid, delusional, or suicidal.
  • A change in weight, such as becoming extremely thin or gaining a lot of weight.
  • A change in bone density.
  • A change in skin color, such as becoming pale, having dark patches, or developing new wrinkles.
  • A change in hair texture or color.
  • A change in sexual function.
  • A change in brain function, such as memory problems, difficulty concentrating, or changes in mood.
  • A change in bowel habits, such as becoming unable to have a bowel movement, having diarrhea more than once a week, or having constipation.
  • A change in the way you feel about yourself, such as feeling like you are losing control or feeling like you are a different person.

Who is most likely to be effected in Purging Disorder?

The person most likely to be effected by "Purging Disorder" is someone who is struggling with an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia. This disorder is characterized by a severe and persistent urge to rid oneself of food or food-related items, even if this means vomiting, fasting, or using laxatives or other purgative methods.

What are severity stages of Purging Disorder?

There are three severity stages of purging disorder: mild, moderate, and severe.

Mild:

Mild purging disorder is characterized by episodes of excessive vomiting or diarrhea, but does not involve the use of dangerous substances or self-harm.

Moderate:

Moderate purging disorder is characterized by episodes of both excessive vomiting and diarrhea, as well as the use of dangerous substances or self-harm.

Severe:

Severe purging disorder is characterized by episodes of excessive vomiting, diarrhea, or both, that result in serious health problems or death.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Which medicines can be used for treatment of "Purging Disorder"?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best medicines for treating purging disorder will vary depending on the individual's specific symptoms. However, some common medicines used to treat purging disorder include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics.

What factors increase severity of "Purging Disorder?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Some possible factors that could increase the severity of "Purging Disorder" include: a history of severe mental health issues, a history of self-injury, a history of substance abuse, a history of eating disorders, a history of bipolar disorder, and a history of anxiety or depression.

Is there any vaccine available for "Purging Disorder"?

There is not currently a vaccine available for "Purging Disorder". However, there are treatments available that may help improve the symptoms.

Which foods shoud be avoid in "Purging Disorder"?

Some foods to avoid during a purge are fatty foods, sugary foods, and foods with high levels of salt.

How long can "Purging Disorder" last?

There is no definitive answer to this question as it can vary from person to person. Some people may experience a brief phase of purging where they lose a large amount of weight or purge their food completely for a period of time. Other people may experience purging disorder for an extended period of time, where they purge multiple times a day or even multiple times a week.

Are there any types of "Purging Disorder"?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the types of "Purging Disorder" vary from person to person. However, some common types of "Purging Disorder" include:

Anorexia Nervosa:

People with anorexia nervosa often have a strong desire to lose weight and may engage in extreme dieting and exercise habits in an effort to achieve this goal. They may also experience intense fear or anxiety about their body weight, which can lead to repeated episodes of purging (e.g. eating large amounts of food and then vomiting it up, using laxatives or diuretics, or cutting down on food intake altogether).

Bulimia Nervosa:

People with bulimia nervosa often binge eat (eat large amounts of food in a short period of time) and then purge (e.g. vomit, use laxatives or diuretics, or cut down on food intake). They may also experience intense fear or anxiety about their weight, which can lead to repeated episodes of purging.

Binge Eating Disorder:

People with binge eating disorder often eat large amounts of food in a short period of time and then feel guilty or ashamed about it. They may also experience intense fear or anxiety about their weight, which can lead to repeated episodes of purging.

Which food can cure "Purging Disorder"?

There is no one food that can cure purging disorder. However, some foods that may help to reduce the frequency and severity of purging episodes include: fruits, vegetables, lean protein, and whole grains.

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