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Melasma

August 30, 2022

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Melasma

What is Melasma?

Melasma is a skin condition that is characterized by the development of brown patches on the face. Melasma is most commonly seen in women in their late twenties or early thirties, but it can occur at any age. Melasma is caused by the overproduction of melanin, a pigment that is responsible for the skin's color. Melanin is produced in the skin in response to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

Melasma is a benign condition that can be treated with topical medications and/or surgery. Topical medications used to treat melasma include hydroquinone (HQ) and tretinoin (TRA). Hydroquinone is a white to light brown compound that is used to lighten the skin. Tretinoin is a white to light yellow compound that is used to improve the appearance of skin texture and tone. Topical medications can be used on a regular basis or as needed.

If melasma is severe, or if it is not responsive to topical medications, surgery may be necessary to remove the brown patches. Surgery typically involves the use of a laser to remove the brown patches. After surgery, the skin may take several weeks to heal.

What are causes of Melasma?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Some possible causes of "Melasma" include:

  • Sun exposure.
  • Hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
  • Certain medications, including birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy.
  • Certain skin conditions, including rosacea and eczema.
  • Certain genetic conditions, such as familial adenomatous polyposis.

What are symptoms of Melasma?

The most common symptoms of melasma are dark patches on the skin that may vary in size, shape and color. They may be light or dark brown, or may be lighter or darker than the surrounding skin. Melasma may also cause patches of redness, swelling and itching.

How to prevent from Melasma?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to preventing melasma, as the best method for preventing melasma will vary depending on the individual's skin type and skin tone. However, some tips to preventing melasma include using sunscreens and sun protection products that are specifically designed to protect against the sun's UV rays, avoiding excessive exposure to the sun, and using a good skin care routine that includes a sunscreen and a moisturizer.

How is Melasma diagnosed?

The most common way to diagnose melasma is by a skin examination. In some cases, a doctor may also perform a blood test to check for a hormone called melatonin.

How is Melasma treated?

There is no one definitive answer to treating melasma. Some people find that using a topical cream or lotion helps to lighten the skin. Other people may need to use a systemic medication such as hydroquinone or tretinoin. Some people may also need to use a combination of treatments.

Some people find that lifestyle changes, such as avoiding the sun, can help to lighten the skin. Some people also find that using a topical sunscreen can help to protect the skin from the sun.

When to consult a doctor in Melasma?

If you are experiencing any changes in your skin, such as an increase in the size, color, or number of lesions, you should consult a doctor. The most common cause of melasma is the use of sunscreens, but other causes include genetics, hormones, and certain medications. If you are concerned about your skin, you should see a doctor for a diagnosis and possible treatment.

Who is most likely to be effected in Melasma?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Some people are more likely to be effected by melasma than others. Some people are also more likely to develop melasma at a certain age than others.

What are severity stages of Melasma?

The severity stages of melasma are:

1. Acneiform melasma:

This is the mildest form of melasma, and is characterized by red, inflamed patches on the skin that may or may not be accompanied by itching.

2. Lentiginous melasma:

This is the more severe form of melasma, and is characterized by patches of brown or black skin that may or may not be accompanied by itching.

3. Pigmented melasma:

This is the most severe form of melasma, and is characterized by patches of dark brown or black skin that may or may not be accompanied by itching.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Which medicines can be used for treatment of "Melasma"?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best treatment plan for melasma will vary depending on the individual's symptoms and medical history. However, some potential treatments include topical creams and lotions designed to lighten skin color, oral medications such as hydroquinone or tretinoin, and laser therapy.

What factors increase severity of "Melasma?

There is no definitive answer to this question as it can vary from person to person. However, some possible factors that may increase the severity of melasma include:

  • Having darker skin than the majority of the population.
  • Having a family history of melasma.
  • Having a high level of sun exposure.
  • Having a genetic disposition to melasma.
  • Having a high level of the hormones estrogen and progesterone.

Is there any vaccine available for "Melasma"?

There is not currently a vaccine available for "Melasma".

Which foods shoud be avoid in "Melasma"?

Some foods that should be avoided in people with melasma are high-fat foods, foods with a lot of sugar, and foods that are spicy.

How long can "Melasma" last?

"Melasma" can last anywhere from a few weeks to several months.

Are there any types of "Melasma"?

There are many types of melasma, including:

Post-inflammatory melasma:

This type of melasma is typically seen after a skin injury, such as a sunburn.

Telangiectasia:

This is a type of melasma that results from the overproduction of blood vessels near the skin.

Neurogenic melasma:

This is a type of melasma that is caused by a problem with the nerves that control the skin.

Pigmentary dysplasia:

This is a type of melasma that is caused by a genetic disorder.

Which food can cure "Melasma"?

There is no definitive answer, but some people believe that certain foods, such as garlic, can help to clear up melasma.

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