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Chronic Renal Disease

August 6, 2022

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Chronic Renal Disease

What is Chronic Renal Disease?

Chronic renal disease (CRD) is a condition in which the kidneys don't work properly. CRD can be caused by many things, including diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity.

Chronic renal disease can lead to kidney failure. If kidney failure happens, the person will need dialysis or a kidney transplant to stay alive.

Chronic renal disease is a major health problem in the United States. It affects about 10 million people, and it is the number one cause of death in people over 65.

There is no cure for chronic renal disease, but there are treatments that can help people stay alive. Dialysis is the most common treatment, and it helps people to stay alive by cleaning their blood.

People with chronic renal disease often need to take other medications to keep their blood pressure and diabetes under control. And they may need to exercise to stay healthy.

There is still much to learn about chronic renal disease, and there are many new treatments being developed all the time. But we are making progress, and we will continue to do so.

What are causes of Chronic Renal Disease?

Chronic renal disease is a condition in which the kidneys do not work properly over a period of time. There are many possible causes of chronic renal disease, including:

  • Age: The average age at which chronic renal disease begins is 65 years old.
  • Race: Chronic renal disease is more common in Caucasians than in African Americans.
  • Family history: People who have a family history of chronic renal disease are more likely to develop the condition.
  • Environmental factors: Exposure to toxins, such as heavy metals, can damage the kidneys.
  • Diabetes: Diabetes is a common cause of chronic renal disease.
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure is a major risk factor for chronic renal disease.
  • Obesity: Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic renal disease.
  • Previous kidney disease: If a person has had previous kidney disease, their kidneys are more likely to fail over time.

What are symptoms of Chronic Renal Disease?

Chronic renal disease is a condition in which the kidneys do not work properly. This can lead to problems with urination, blood pressure, and overall health. There are many different types of chronic renal disease, and each is caused by different things. Some common symptoms of chronic renal disease include:

  • Urine that is dark or black in color.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine produced each day.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is clear.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is concentrated.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is odorless.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of blood.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of protein.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of sugar.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of calcium.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of magnesium.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of potassium.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of chloride.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of sulfates.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of phosphates.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is free of nitrogen.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is cloudy.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is bloody.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is strong-smelling.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is light-colored.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is weak-smelling.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is painful to pass.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is difficult to pass.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is involuntary.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is frequent.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is sudden.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is continuous.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is intermittent.

How to prevent from Chronic Renal Disease?

Prevention of chronic renal disease is a lifelong effort. The following are some tips to help you maintain good kidney health:

1. Eat a balanced diet. Include plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

2. Exercise regularly. Exercise can help keep your blood pressure low and your heart healthy.

3. Avoid smoking. Smoking can damage your kidneys and increase your risk of developing chronic renal disease.

4. Avoid excessive drinking. Drinking too much alcohol can damage your kidneys.

5. Get regular checkups. Make sure to get a checkup every year to check your kidney function.

How is Chronic Renal Disease diagnosed?

Chronic renal disease is diagnosed by a doctor by reviewing the patient's medical history and performing a physical exam. The doctor will also perform a blood test to measure the level of creatinine in the blood.

How is Chronic Renal Disease treated?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to treating chronic renal disease, as the best treatment will vary depending on the individual's specific situation and health condition. However, common treatments for chronic renal disease include medications to improve blood flow to the kidneys, lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of kidney damage, and regular checkups to ensure that the kidneys are functioning properly.

When to consult a doctor in Chronic Renal Disease?

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, you should consult a doctor:

  • A high level of creatinine in your blood.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine you produce.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is clear or colorless.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is concentrated.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is odorless.
  • A change in the amount of blood in your urine.
  • A change in the amount of protein in your urine.
  • A decrease in the amount of blood in your urine.
  • A decrease in the amount of protein in your urine.
  • A change in the amount of color in your urine.
  • A change in the amount of odor in your urine.
  • A change in the amount of shape in your urine.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine you produce.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is clear or colorless.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is concentrated.
  • A decrease in the amount of urine that is odorless.
  • A change in the amount of blood in your urine.
  • A change in the amount of shape in your urine.

Who is most likely to be effected in Chronic Renal Disease?

The person most likely to be effected by chronic renal disease is a middle-aged or elderly person. This is because the kidneys are less able to function as they age, and the disease can progress more quickly in these individuals. Other people who are at risk for chronic renal disease include people who have a family history of the disease, people who have a history of hypertension or heart disease, and people who are obese.

What are severity stages of Chronic Renal Disease?

There are six severity stages of chronic renal disease (CRD): pre-dialysis, early dialysis, moderate dialysis, late dialysis, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and death.

Pre-dialysis:

The person has normal kidney function and does not require dialysis.

Early dialysis:

The person has moderate kidney function and requires dialysis three or four times a week.

Moderate dialysis:

The person has severe kidney function and requires dialysis two or three times a week.

Late dialysis:

The person has end-stage renal disease and requires dialysis one or two times a week.

End-stage renal disease:

The person has ESRD and will never be able to completely eliminate their own urine.

Death:

The person has died from CRD.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Which medicines can be used for treatment of "Chronic Renal Disease"?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best treatment for a person's individual chronic renal disease will vary depending on the specific condition. However, some common treatments for chronic renal disease include medications to improve blood flow to the kidneys (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta blockers), medications to reduce inflammation in the kidneys (anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen), and medications to help the kidneys filter blood (cholestyramine and colestipol).

What factors increase severity of "Chronic Renal Disease?

The severity of chronic renal disease is increased by the following factors:

1. Age: The severity of chronic renal disease increases with age.

2. Race: The severity of chronic renal disease is increased in blacks and Hispanics compared to whites.

3. Sex: The severity of chronic renal disease is increased in men compared to women.

4. Family history: The severity of chronic renal disease is increased in people who have a family history of the disease.

Is there any vaccine available for "Chronic Renal Disease"?

There is currently no vaccine available for "Chronic Renal Disease". However, research is ongoing to develop a vaccine that could prevent or treat this condition.

Which foods shoud be avoid in "Chronic Renal Disease"?

Some foods to avoid in people with chronic renal disease include: red meat, processed meat, sugary drinks, and high-sodium foods.

How long can "Chronic Renal Disease" last?

Chronic renal disease can last a lifetime.

Are there any types of "Chronic Renal Disease"?

There are many types of "Chronic Renal Disease". Some of the more common types of "Chronic Renal Disease" include:

  • Acute Renal Failure.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease.
  • End-Stage Renal Disease.
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease.

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